Posts from ‘Design’

Apr
28
1955 Hudson, by Citroen

What if another manufacturer had created their own version of 1955 Hudson?

By Frank Peiler

Anybody who knows a little something about automotive history knows that Hudson merged with Nash in 1954 to form American Motors.  As a result, AMC had to come up with a new Hudson in record time to make the 1955 model year.  The design department at Nash did a very good job transforming the Ambassador/Statesman into a  new Hudson.  The new car didn’t look much like a Hudson, and it certainly didn’t handle at all like previous “step-down” Hudsons, but the design was a refreshing change from the old and tired car.  However, what would the 1955 Hudson look like had the merger been between General Motors, Ford Motor Company, Chrysler Corporation, or the newly merged Studebaker/Packard?

Mar
29
1970 Oldsmobile Toronado

1970 Oldsmobile Toronado

Having been born in 1965, I can’t claim to have been very aware of the vehicles of 1970 when they were new, nor can I claim to have experienced them from behind the wheel.

Mar
08
2018 Pontiac GX7

The GX7 midsize crossover would be the largest vehicle in the 2018 Pontiac lineup.

Illustrations by Frank Peiler

Since the turn of the century, U.S. car sellers have been shedding brands faster than the cable TV networks have been creating reality shows.

Feb
24
2016 CX-5 and 2017 CX-5

2017 Mazda CX-5 (left) and 2016 Mazda CX-5

The official launch of the redesigned-for-2017 Mazda CX-5 is just around the corner; it’s slated to begin arriving in dealerships later this spring. The new CX-5 represents an evolution of Mazda’s KODO—Soul of Motion design theme, a motif that debuted on the Mazda Shinari concept car of 2010. The new bodywork also bears an obvious family resemblance to the CX-5’s larger sibling—the redesigned-for-2016 Mazda CX-9 midsize SUV.

Feb
14
New Car colors for 2017

Damon takes a closer look at the most-interesting colors seen at the 2017 Chicago Auto Show.

2017 Chicago Auto ShowBored with beige? Sick of silver? Weary of white? Tired of tan? Chagrined by champagne? Troubled b… OK, sorry, we’ll stop. Though muted, conservative colors seem to dominate in the new-vehicle marketplace, most manufacturers offer at least a couple unusual hues in their factory-paint palettes. Auto shows are a great place to see these colors up close and in person on a new vehicle, instead of looking at a computer screen or a paint chip at the dealer. If you’re an extroverted type who wants your ride to turn heads, an out-of-the-ordinary color is a great way to do it. Keep in mind, however, that these colors can fall out of fashion much quicker than the “safe” standby colors, which can be an issue come resale time.

Jan
10
Nissan VMotion 2.0 concept

Nissan VMotion 2.0 concept

2017 Detroit Auto Show

DETROIT—Nissan unveiled its VMotion 2.0 concept car at the 2017 North American International Auto Show in Detroit, forecasting the design theme that future Nissan production sedans will follow.

Nov
17
Subaru VIZIV-7 Concept

Subaru VIZIV-7 Concept

2016 LA Auto Show Logo LOS ANGELES—Subaru is currently in the process of developing a new three-row, 7-passenger midsize SUV that is slated to hit the market in early 2018. The company dropped a few hints about what that SUV will look like at the 2016 Los Angeles Auto Show.

Oct
24
1979 Cadillac Eldorado
1979 Cadillac Eldorado

Special is a funny word, and it doesn’t always mean something good. One hopes to avoid “special” classes in grade school, for example, and there isn’t a kid alive that looks forward to a bowl of Special K.

Oct
17
1994 Chrysler LHS
1994 Chrysler LHS

The term “cab forward” was first used by the railroad industry to describe steam engines designed with the passenger compartment located toward the front of the vehicle. The advantage of the layout was a clear and unfettered view of the track ahead. For this reason, cab-forward engines were most commonly seen in rail yards where traffic is heavy.

Oct
12
1947 Studebaker Wagon Concept

Studebaker almost offered a wagon for 1947. Here’s what it might have looked like…

By Frank Peiler

Just after World War II, Studebaker was readying its radical new postwar cars for introduction to a car-hungry public. There would be a nearly complete range of body styles available–from two-door sedans to convertibles–but no station wagons, even though a prototype four-door woodie wagon was featured in a LIFE magazine article.

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