Posts from ‘Engines’

Oct
08
2018 Dodge Demon

2018 Dodge Challenger SRT Demon

Consumer Guide Automotive It’s all about the launch.

That was the lesson we learned when Dodge invited a group of journalists up to US 131 Motorsports Park in Martin, Michigan, to pilot its new Challenger SRT Demon down a gen-u-ine drag strip – complete with burn-out box, gooey starting-line surface, staging lights, and a full quarter-mile run. The real deal. Personally, it was the first time I’d ever driven a car on a drag strip … at least, one that didn’t have center stripes and a grossly ignored speed-limit sign (don’t tell the feds). We also learned that getting the launch right is not nearly as easy as one might think.

Oct
02
1978 Ford Granada (left) and 2017 Ford Fusion

1978 Ford Granada (left) and 2017 Ford Fusion

It will come as no surprise to you that cars have gotten heavier as of late. There’s good reason for that. Things like side-impact protection, rollover protection, crush zones, and designed-in protections against partial-offset collisions (and other specific impacts studied by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety) all add considerable bulk to a given vehicle.

Aug
28
Hemi 2.6 Badge

Fender badge of a 1981 Dodge Aries

By the end of the Seventies, it seemed as if the marketing types at Chrysler had given up worrying about protecting legacy brands. In 1978, for example, the company rolled out a small, Mitsubishi-built 4-cylinder Dodge coupe, which the company rather thoughtlessly dubbed Challenger.

Aug
02
GM LLR Vortec 3700

The LLR Vortec 3700 is one version of the only 5-cylinder engine General Motors has ever made available in the U.S.

Americans tend to enjoy their engine cylinder counts in even numbers. Engines of 4-, 6-, and 8 cylinders have powered an overwhelmingly large majority of the vehicles ever sold in the U.S, and for good reason.

Jul
10
1977 Chrysler 318

The Chrysler corporate 318-cubic-inch engine was the smallest V8 available in the 1977 Plymouth Fury.

Car-guy discussions regarding automotive downsizing usually center on styling. I have done my share of kvetching about how a few model lines that were “resized” in the late Seventies and early Eighties came off looking like caricatures of the cars they replaced.

Nov
07
Chrysler 360-inch V8

Chrysler 360-cubic-inch V8

Big is a relative term. In regards to American passenger-car engines, “big” in the early Seventies meant 460 cubic inches from Ford; 440 cubic inches from Chrysler; and 454, 455, and even 500 cubic inches from General Motors.

Jun
13
Chevy IndyCar

Note the slanted engine cover on Chevy’s IndyCar …

Honda IndyCar

… While Honda’s has a more horizontal cover.

Last month’s Indianapolis 500 marked the 100th running of “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing,” which originated at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway in 1911. (The math doesn’t work out for the intervening year span because the race wasn’t run during World War I and World War II.)

While the early races featured many cars that were essentially stripped-down production models – with wildly different specifications – it quickly became a contest between specially built racing machines. And in recent years, those machines have been primarily differentiated by what engine was powering them.

Jan
15
Chevrolet 350

Chevrolet 350-cubic-inch V8

 

Presented here is an unedited press release received by Consumer Guide today.

DETROIT – Chevrolet Camaro has tracked the rise, fall and resurgence of American performance for nearly 50 years, making it a bellwether of horsepower.

Dec
10
2016 Porsche Boxster S

2016 Porsche Boxster S

Presented here is an unedited press release received by Consumer Guide today.

Boxster and Cayman to be branded as 718 model range next year

Porsche’s mid-engine sports cars to receive new name

 Atlanta, Georgia. The mid-engine sports cars from Dr. Ing. h.c. F. Porsche AG will be named 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman, respectively, when the models are introduced over the course of 2016. The 718 designation is a reference to the ground-breaking sports car Porsche introduced back in 1957, which achieved great success in a number of renowned car races. The 718 Boxster and 718 Cayman will share more similarities than ever before – both visually and technically. In the future, both will have equally powerful turbocharged flat-four cylinder engines. The Roadster will be positioned at a higher price level than the Coupe – as is the case with the 911 models.

Jun
22
1955-Studebaker-Pickup-Advertisement

With 140 horsepower, this Studebaker’s 244-cubic-inch “Commander” V8 was muscular for its time, but it falls 225 horses short of the least-powerful engine on our top-5 list of current truck engines.

In 1990, Chevrolet rolled out the 454 SS, an outrageous performance-oriented version of the brand’s full-size pickup truck. At its heart was a tuned version of General Motors’ “big block” 454-cubic-inch (7.4-liter) V8. The engine was rated at 230 horsepower and a stump-pulling 385 pound-feet of torque.

Vehicle Makes

Classic Cars

Collectible Automobile Magazine

Popular Posts & Pages

Recent Posts

Shopping for a new or used car or truck?

Check out all of our reviews here.