Author Archive

Nov
19
Lexus LC 500 Convertible

2021 Lexus LC 500 Convertible

Los Angeles Auto ShowWell, it’s official now… the Lexus LC 500 grand touring coupe will be joined by a convertible version for 2021. At the beginning of this year, Lexus displayed a LC 500 Convertible Concept at the 2019 Detroit Auto Show, and the production version that is making its global debut at the 2019 Los Angeles Auto Show is remarkably close to the show car.

Apr
26
1938 Peugeot 402 B Retractable Hardtop

1938 Peugeot 402 B Retractable Hardtop

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2007 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Chrysler’s streamlined 1934 Airflow flopped in America, but it was an inspiration to French automaker Peugeot. With headquarters in Paris and its main plant in Sochaux near the Swiss border, Peugeot is the second-oldest automaker in the world.

Dec
26
1953 Kaiser Dragon

1953 Kaiser Dragon

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2011 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Henry J. Kaiser was part of the consortium that completed the daunting task of building Hoover Dam more than two years ahead of schedule. No one had mass produced ships until Kaiser built World War II Liberty Ships in as little as five days. Perhaps, then, Henry could have been excused for thinking he could revolutionize car building as well. He must have soon realized that it was a bigger job than expected and that the men running Detroit were smarter than he gave them credit for being.

Dec
15
1947 Bentley Mark VI

1947 Bentley Mark VI Drophead Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the April 2002 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Bentleys were fast sport tourers—absolutely dependable, but loud. By 1931, when Bentley Motors went into receivership, its larger cars were competing with Rolls-Royce. In a surprise move, Rolls bought its English competitor to prevent future rivalry.

Nov
21
1933 Twin Coach Bakery Truck

1933 Twin Coach Bakery Truck

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2015 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Long before gourmet food trucks began peddling high-end lunches and pricey cupcakes on city streets, Helms Bakery trucks were a common sight in Southern California. Starting in 1931, Helms delivered bread, doughnuts, pies, cookies, pastries, and other baked goods to people’s homes. Its products were not sold in stores. Indeed, the company’s slogan was “Daily at your door.” Customers could place a Helms placard in their window as a signal for the “Helmsman” to stop—or just flag down a truck as it passed by. Based in Culver City, the Helms Bakery fleet ranged as far north as Fresno and as far south as San Diego. It delivered its last loaf in 1969.

Jul
27
1954 International Model R-140 Station Wagon

1954 International Model R-140 Station Wagon

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2009 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

When the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in North Dakota needed three tough station wagons that could go anywhere in the wilds of the Northern plains, it chose the 1954 International R-140 with four-wheel drive. Why the Corps needed three such wagons is a mystery.

Jul
25
1941 Packard One Sixty Deluxe Convertible Coupe

1941 Packard One Sixty Deluxe Convertible Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2016 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Packard’s policy of gradual styling changes helped it to maintain a gold standard of resale value and allowed owners to keep their cars longer without looking dated. This linear styling policy served Packard well until the Forties. By then, though, American car design was changing at an incredible rate. Packard’s unhurried design evolution couldn’t keep up with the pace, and by ’41, its cars looked old fashioned.

Jun
20
1913 Chevrolet Type C Tourer

1913 Chevrolet Type C Tourer

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2016 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

The first Chevrolet doesn’t seem like a Chevy. It wasn’t reasonably priced or modestly sized. It didn’t have an overhead-valve engine. It didn’t even wear a bowtie badge.

Jun
15
What Was The Harold and Maude Car

Harold and Maude Jaguar E-Type Hearse

For many car enthusiasts, the most memorable (and cringe-inducing) element of the 1971 cult-classic movie Harold and Maude is the conversion of a Jaguar E-Type roadster into a hearse. Harold and Maude is the offbeat story of a death-obsessed young man, Harold (Bud Cort), who falls in love with a free-spirited elderly woman, Maude (Ruth Gordon). Harold and Maude was an early work by acclaimed director Hal Ashby, who would go on to direct such films as The Last Detail, Coming Home, Shampoo, and Being There.

Feb
23
The Phantom Thread Bristol 405 Saloon

Instead of a Rolls Royce or Bentley, Phantom Thread producers put wealthy and successful lead character Reynolds Woodcock in a Bristol 405 sedan.

The recently released period-piece drama Phantom Thread is a noteworthy film for many reasons. For starters, it was written and directed by celebrated auteur Paul Thomas Anderson, it’s been nominated for six Academy Awards (including Best Picture and Actor in a Leading Role), and it stars Oscar-winning thespian Daniel Day-Lewis in what Day-Lewis himself says is his last acting performance. For car enthusiasts, however, the film’s Bristol 405 four-door saloon is the real star.