Author Archive

Nov
22
1965 Ford Falcon Squire

1965 Ford Falcon Squire

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The Ford Falcon was Robert McNamara’s baby. A practical “numbers guy,” McNamara hated waste and excess. The Edsel went against his core beliefs with its large size, superfluous decoration, and the fact that it competed with existing Ford and Mercury products. As the Edsel was failing, McNamara was campaigning for a compact Ford.

Nov
09
1959 Chevrolet 3100 Fleetside

1959 Chevrolet 3100 Fleetside

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

American servicemen learned the value of four-wheel drive with “jeeps” during World War II. In the postwar era, Willys sold a civilian version and a larger 4×4 pickup. Meanwhile, Dodge added a heavier-duty Power Wagon four-wheeler.

Oct
11
1955 Monarch Richelieu Convertible

1955 Monarch Richelieu Convertible

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The population of Canada in the Fifties was less than 10 percent than that of the United States, yet Ford Motor Company sold up to six brands of cars in Canada. For as odd of an idea as that sounds, there was a reason for it.

Aug
11
1953 Nash Rambler Custom Convertible

1953 Nash Rambler Custom Convertible

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The Nash Rambler went against conventional economy-car wisdom when it bowed as a pricey convertible instead of a low-priced sedan. When the compact was introduced in 1950, World War II had been over for five years, yet raw materials were still regulated by the government and Nash wouldn’t have been able to get enough steel to meet the expected demand for the new Rambler. Since production would be limited, Nash decided to build a high-profit car.

Aug
09
Photo Feature: 1970 Plymouth Sport Suburban

1970 Plymouth Sport Suburban

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Frank Troost says his 1970 Plymouth Sport Suburban draws a common comment when he has it out: “We had one when I was a kid, but I haven’t seen one in years.” That’s not surprising since the American station wagon was immensely popular in the Sixties and Seventies, yet the survival rate has been low. 

Jul
13
1934 Studebaker Commander Four-Door Sedan

1934 Studebaker Commander Four-Door Sedan

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2017 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

From the Speedway Comes Their Stamina, From the Skyway Comes Their Style” was the tagline for Studebaker advertising in 1934. The skyway reference was an attempt to tie Studebaker’s streamlined styling to aviation. The speedway reference was more grounded in fact.

Jul
05
1955 Willys Wagon

1955 Willys Utility Wagon

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2017 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

After building 362,841 four-wheel-drive 1⁄4-ton military scout cars—the legendary “jeep”—during World War II, Willys needed something to sell postwar. A civilian version of the Willys MB was introduced, but the company wanted something more mainstream.  

May
11
1955 Studebaker E7

1955 Studebaker E7

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Studebaker got off to a good start in the postwar truck market with the 1949 R-series trucks that had fresh styling by Robert E. Bourke. While running boards were still prominently displayed on the competing new designs from the Big Three brands, Bourke’s truck cab looked more modern with the running  boards concealed under the doors. 

Mar
10
1959 Buick LeSabre Convertible

1959 Buick LeSabre Convertible

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2015 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The latest Buick commercials feature surprised individuals who exclaim “That’s not a Buick!” when confronted by one of the marque’s new vehicles, implying how much the brand has changed in recent years even if people’s perceptions of it haven’t yet. In 1959, Buick could have used the same tagline.

Feb
18
1971 Toyota Celica ST Hardtop Coupe

1971 Toyota Celica ST Hardtop Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2015 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

In 1971, Toyota introduced its Celica sport coupe, a car that many automotive magazines compared to the original Ford Mustang. By 1971, Mustang had grown eight inches longer and 600 pounds heavier than the ’65 original. (Ford President Lee Iacocca realized this was too big for a “ponycar” and had a much smaller Mustang in the pipeline.) Meanwhile, import coupes such as the Celica, Opel Manta, and Mercury Capri catered to those who wanted a sporty car that was smaller than the early Seventies ponycars.