Posts from ‘Dodge’

Apr
04
Chrysler 300

Chrysler 300

My father has owned a total of one non-American-brand vehicles in his life. That vehicle was a 1999 Subaru Forester, which he purchased used from me. Now in his eighties, my dad has never strayed too far from a core vehicle type—that being a largish sedan featuring inoffensive styling and something more than 4-cylinder power under the hood. In reverse order, his most recent cars include a Chrysler 300, Buick Lucerne, Oldsmobile Aurora, and an Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme.

Mar
25
Stellantis Hurricane Engines

The Stellantis Hurricane engine will be available in standard (left) and H.O. (High Output) variations.

Stellantis, the parent company of Chrysler, Dodge, Jeep, and Ram in the U.S., revealed a new family of 6-cylinder engines dubbed Hurricane. The twin-turbocharged 3.0-liter inline engines are designed to match the power output of naturally aspirated V8 powerplants while being more fuel efficient and producing less pollution.

Mar
17
Hardtop Ads

1964 Mercury Marauder

Say the word “hardtop” and any vintage-auto enthusiast knows what you’re referring to: a closed-roof car with a pillarless roofline (i.e., no door posts to break up the flow of the styling).  Though there were earlier examples of the basic concept, General Motors kicked off the hardtop as we know it by introducing a pillarless-coupe body style in its Buick, Cadillac, and Oldsmobile product lines midway through the 1949 model year.

Mar
09
1972 Plymouth Fury, Large Coupe Ads, Large-Coupe Ads

1972 Plymouth Fury

Question: What would large-coupe drivers of the Seventies and Eighties drive today? Answer: Not large coupes, because there aren’t any. I suppose there’s still the Bentley Continental and the BMW 8-Series, but that’s not really what we’re talking about here.

Feb
21
1987 Suzuki Samurai

1987 Suzuki Samurai

Sometime in the middle of the Eighties, Americans developed an appetite—albeit a modest one—for pint-sized sport-utility vehicles with legitimate off-road capability. Early on the scene were the Suzuki Samurai and the Daihatsu Rocky. Few people actually recall Daihatsu’s brief flirtation with the U.S. market—briefly, Daihatsu sold cars Stateside between 1988 and 1992. Only two models were ever offered here: the aforementioned Rocky, and a subcompact car dubbed Charade.

Feb
14
Dodge Super8 Hemi Concept

Dodge Super8 Hemi Concept

Forgotten Concepts, Forgotten Concepts

This is an installment in a series of posts looking back on show cars that we feel deserved a little more attention than they got. If you have a suggestion for a Forgotten Concept topic, please shoot us a line or leave a comment below.

Feb
03
1959 Dodge Custom Lancer, Pink Car Ads

1959 Dodge Custom Royal Lancer

As far as colors go, pink is a relative newbie. Per Wikipedia, pink was first used as a color name in the late seventeenth century. As a car color, pink’s use has been sporadic at best, though for a brief moment in time (really just the mid Fifties into the early Sixties), pink cars were all the rage.

Jan
27
1968 Dodge Charger

1968 Dodge Charger

The 1968 Dodge Charger is an unassailable classic muscle car, and one of the most sinisterly beautiful cars ever made. The new-for-1968 Dodge and Plymouth intermediate cars had shed almost all the dowdiness of their earlier-1960s counterparts, introducing sleeker new shapes that seemed tailor-made for scoops and stripes… and the Dodge Charger’s transformation was the most dramatic of the bunch.

Jan
25
Dodge Tomahawk Concept

Dodge Tomahawk Concept

Forgotten Concepts, Forgotten Concepts

This is an installment in a series of posts looking back on show cars that we feel deserved a little more attention than they got. If you have a suggestion for a Forgotten Concept topic, please shoot us a line or leave a comment below.

Jan
17
1971 Fargo

1972 Fargo

Fun fact: 90 percent of Canada’s population lives with 100 miles of the U.S. border. That said, it’s an awfully long border—about 5500 miles long, actually. Looked at another way, Canada’s population density is only about 10 percent that of America’s, meaning there’s a lot of Canadian land with very few people living on it.