Posts from ‘Packard’

Oct
30
1973 Porsche 914

1973 Porsche 914

I recall a time, oh, 38 years ago, when my folks forbade me from driving to a friend’s house because it was raining. At the time, even if I believed that rain in any way made driving more dangerous, I wasn’t prepared to admit it. Besides, real car guys were unafraid of driving in snow, at night, and through downpours. Honestly, I still enjoy driving around through fresh snow.

Jun
22
1985 Dodge 600 ES Convertible

1985 Dodge 600 ES

The bad news is that fewer than one of every hundred cars sold in the United States is a convertible. (I will spare you the fractional math required to pass along the number of manual-transmission-equipped convertibles sold on our shores last year, but it’s fewer still.)

Apr
01
Classic Automatic Transmission Ads

1950 Packard

As you likely already know, the manual transmission is all but dead. Nothing drove home this point better than the news that in 2019, pure-electric vehicles outsold vehicles equipped with manual transmissions in the U.S.

Nov
26
Depression Era Car Ads

1938 Graham

Though American automobile industry was fully established–and thriving–by the time the 1920s rolled around, the auto business was still relatively young when the Great Depression settled upon the nation at the tail end of that free-wheeling decade. After an extended period of economic growth and prosperity, carmakers found themselves needing to retool their carefully crafted advertising to cope with the new realities of severe economic turmoil.

Aug
27
Mercedes-Benz 300SL Designs, Mercedes-Benz 300SL Designs

1952 Mercedes-Benz W194 race car (L), and some of Collectible Automobile Publisher Frank Peiler’s “what-if” designs.

By Frank Peiler

It was early 1952 when Mercedes-Benz was in the midst of developing the 300SL sports car.  The skeletal frame, drivetrain and suspension were beautifully engineered masterpieces. However, the original form-follows-function body looked like a half-used bar of soap with a cap stuck on top. Let’s say that in this post-WWII era of rebuilding, there wasn’t much of a design department at Mercedes-Benz that the company could turn to.

Oct
17
1999 Packard Twelve Concept

1999 Packard Twelve Concept

If you’re roughly my age—let’s say five decades into this whole life process—you’ve seen a fair number of automobile brands fade into the sunset.

I was probably most impacted by the demise of Pontiac, but I remember feeling a twinge of sadness at the deaths of AMC, Mercury, Oldsmobile, Plymouth, and—no kidding—Checker.

Aug
23
Coolest Dashboards

1955 Packard

by Frank Peiler

In the early days of the automobile, dashboards were just that: wooden planks onto which gauges and switches were mounted.

By the early Thirties, wood dashboards were replaced by steel, and designers began to take an interest in the collection of dials and knobs located there.

Jul
25
1941 Packard One Sixty Deluxe Convertible Coupe

1941 Packard One Sixty Deluxe Convertible Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2016 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Packard’s policy of gradual styling changes helped it to maintain a gold standard of resale value and allowed owners to keep their cars longer without looking dated. This linear styling policy served Packard well until the Forties. By then, though, American car design was changing at an incredible rate. Packard’s unhurried design evolution couldn’t keep up with the pace, and by ’41, its cars looked old fashioned.

Jul
17
1953 Packard Clipper

1953 Packard Clipper

There’s no question that Packard is out of business, but there is some disagreement as to when the company really wrapped things up. Though the Packard brand officially died after 1958, some purists consider 1956 to be the marque’s final year, as that was the last time the automaker built its own cars based on its own designs and technology.

Mar
24
1956 Buick Special Wagon, Classic Ads From 1956

1956 Buick Special Wagon

The emergence of automotive tail fins can be attributed in a large part to America’s fascination with air and space travel. At the dawn of the jet age, it was common for manufacturers to hawk their wares–automotive and otherwise–with references to fighter planes and rockets.