Posts from ‘TV and Movie Cars’

Nov
14
Ford v Ferrari

Christian Bale (left) and Matt Damon in Ford v Ferrari, which opens November 15, nationwide.

Film may have been born as a visual medium, but when the first “talkies” hit the silver screen more than 90 years ago, sound quite literally entered the picture. Should you go to see Ford v Ferrari, the new Hollywood movie about the quest to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans in 1966, you’ll be glad it did.

Aug
13
The Cars of Once Upon a Time...in Hollywood

Brad Pitt plays stuntman Cliff Booth in Quentin Tarantino’s Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood.

Advertised as Quentin Tarantino’s ninth film, Once Upon a Time…in Hollywood is the story of a middle-aged actor and his longtime stuntman and personal friend set around the time of the Manson murders.

Jun
06
Good Omens Car

What would an agent of Satan drive?

With an IMDB.com user rating of 8.6, the comedy/fantasy miniseries Good Omens has proven to be a hit with viewers. The Amazon Prime original program is based on a novel written by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman, and stars Michael Sheen and David Tennant as supernatural beings conspiring to prevent an end-times apocalypse.

Apr
12
Worst Car Commercials

Is this a scene from the worst car commercial of all time? Read on…

For as relatively new a form of communication as television is, the content broadcast via that medium ages incredibly quickly. In terms of style and language, it may be difficult to tell a book written in 1920 from one penned a couple of decades later. Television history, however, is well defined by rather short epochs, and none is more easily recognizable or uniquely self contained than the Eighties.

Jul
16

Kids Show Cars

The wonderful thing about bad movies, especially bad action/adventure movies, is that they are often redeemed (at least partially) by something utterly absurd.

Jun
15
What Was The Harold and Maude Car

Harold and Maude Jaguar E-Type Hearse

For many car enthusiasts, the most memorable (and cringe-inducing) element of the 1971 cult-classic movie Harold and Maude is the conversion of a Jaguar E-Type roadster into a hearse. Harold and Maude is the offbeat story of a death-obsessed young man, Harold (Bud Cort), who falls in love with a free-spirited elderly woman, Maude (Ruth Gordon). Harold and Maude was an early work by acclaimed director Hal Ashby, who would go on to direct such films as The Last Detail, Coming Home, Shampoo, and Being There.

Mar
26
Simon Templar and Volvo P1800, What did The Saint Drive?

Roger Moore starred as Simon Templar in the popular show The Saint, which ran from 1962-1969 on British TV.

Here’s a question for you: What was Jaguar’s biggest-ever marketing blunder? Many might argue it was the X-Type, a compact sedan that was little more than a Ford Mondeo (called Contour in the U.S.) gilded with a Jaguar grille, curvy sheet metal, and some extra wood and leather inside. By virtually every measure, the X-Type was a flop as a Jaguar, though the wagon version was not without its charms.

Feb
23
The Phantom Thread Bristol 405 Saloon

Instead of a Rolls Royce or Bentley, Phantom Thread producers put wealthy and successful lead character Reynolds Woodcock in a Bristol 405 sedan.

The recently released period-piece drama Phantom Thread is a noteworthy film for many reasons. For starters, it was written and directed by celebrated auteur Paul Thomas Anderson, it’s been nominated for six Academy Awards (including Best Picture and Actor in a Leading Role), and it stars Oscar-winning thespian Daniel Day-Lewis in what Day-Lewis himself says is his last acting performance. For car enthusiasts, however, the film’s Bristol 405 four-door saloon is the real star.

Jan
22
GMC MotorHome

GMC MotorHome

In the large motorhome biz, it is customary for a coachbuilder to purchase a basic chassis and powertrain from a truck maker, and then assemble its end product on that procured rolling framework. That’s how big-name motorhome companies such as Winnebago and Holiday Rambler do it.

Nov
08
Jim Rockford Firebird, Rockford Files

Though they were nowhere near as flashy as the typical “star car,” the no-nonsense Pontiac Firebirds that James Garner drove on The Rockford Files are among the best-loved TV/movie vehicles of all time.

Jim Rockford is the only TV detective with a driving move named for him. The late James Garner, who played Jim Rockford, didn’t invent the reverse 180-degree “J-turn,” but he used it so often in The Rockford Files television series that the maneuver is forever associated with the character. To execute a “Rockford,” Jim Rockford would drive about 35 mph in reverse, then let off the gas, turn the steering wheel sharply, and pull on the emergency brake. The car’s front end would swing around 180 degrees, and Rockford would be off—now driving forward.