Posts from ‘Collectible Automobile Magazine’

Nov
22
1965 Ford Falcon Squire

1965 Ford Falcon Squire

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The Ford Falcon was Robert McNamara’s baby. A practical “numbers guy,” McNamara hated waste and excess. The Edsel went against his core beliefs with its large size, superfluous decoration, and the fact that it competed with existing Ford and Mercury products. As the Edsel was failing, McNamara was campaigning for a compact Ford.

Nov
09
1959 Chevrolet 3100 Fleetside

1959 Chevrolet 3100 Fleetside

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

American servicemen learned the value of four-wheel drive with “jeeps” during World War II. In the postwar era, Willys sold a civilian version and a larger 4×4 pickup. Meanwhile, Dodge added a heavier-duty Power Wagon four-wheeler.

Oct
22
Lucid and Rivian Reach Production

Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast

Whether you drive a car, need a car, or just occasionally bum a ride with friends, you’ve come to the right place. Join the editors of Consumer Guide Automotive as they break down everything that’s going on in the auto world. New-car reviews, shopping tips, driving green, electric cars, classic cars, and plenty of great guests. This is the Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast.

Oct
14
2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody

2020 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat Widebody

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2020 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Camaro ZL1Nearly five years ago we took our first look at the Dodge Charger Hellcat. Now for 2020, Dodge has tweaked the car into the new “Widebody” variant. It’s different enough that we think it’s time for a Future Collectibles second look.

Oct
11
1955 Monarch Richelieu Convertible

1955 Monarch Richelieu Convertible

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The population of Canada in the Fifties was less than 10 percent than that of the United States, yet Ford Motor Company sold up to six brands of cars in Canada. For as odd of an idea as that sounds, there was a reason for it.

Oct
05
1990 Mercedes-Benz 500SL

1990 Mercedes-Benz 500SL

Cheap Wheels

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2020 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

The word “cheap” usually isn’t associated with the Mercedes-Benz SL. But we think the unexpected can make great cheap wheels, so let’s take a look at the 1990-1993 Mercedes-Benz 500SL and 1994-1998 SL500—all of which are unexpectedly affordable these days, even in very good condition.

Aug
23

Automotive Heritage Foundation

 

A blog post that ran on The Daily Drive and two articles that appeared in its automotive-history companion publication came in for awards when the fourth-annual Automotive Heritage Awards (AHA) were presented recently.

Aug
13
Favorite New-Car Features

Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast

Whether you drive a car, need a car, or just occasionally bum a ride with friends, you’ve come to the right place. Join the editors of Consumer Guide Automotive as they break down everything that’s going on in the auto world. New-car reviews, shopping tips, driving green, electric cars, classic cars, and plenty of great guests. This is the Consumer Guide Car Stuff Podcast.

Aug
12
2001 GMC Sierra C3

2001 GMC Sierra C3

Cheap Wheels

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2020 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Even if you’re only vaguely aware of GMC products in general and Sierra full-sized pickups in particular, you probably know the brand’s most stylish and luxurious examples have long worn the Denali nameplate. Denali made its debut as GMC’s top-of-the-line 1998 Yukon sport-utility vehicle. Before GMC got around to cataloging a Sierra Denali, however, there was the mostly forgotten (not by us, obviously) 2001 Sierra C3.

Aug
11
1953 Nash Rambler Custom Convertible

1953 Nash Rambler Custom Convertible

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The Nash Rambler went against conventional economy-car wisdom when it bowed as a pricey convertible instead of a low-priced sedan. When the compact was introduced in 1950, World War II had been over for five years, yet raw materials were still regulated by the government and Nash wouldn’t have been able to get enough steel to meet the expected demand for the new Rambler. Since production would be limited, Nash decided to build a high-profit car.