Dec
21
2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt in Dark Highland Green

2015 Audi Q52019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

Class: Sporty/Performance Car

Miles driven: 189

Fuel used: 13.1 gallons

Real-world fuel economy: 14.4 mpg

Driving mix: 80% city, 20% highway

EPA-estimated fuel economy: 15/24/18 (city, highway, combined)

Fuel type: Premium gas recommended

CG Report Card
Big & Tall comfort ratings are for front seats only. "Big" rating based on male tester weighing approximately 350 pounds, "Tall" rating based on 6'6"-tall male tester.
Room and ComfortB
Power and PerformanceA
Fit and FinishB
Fuel EconomyD+
ValueC+
Report-card grades are derived from a consensus of test-driver evaluations. All grades are versus other vehicles in the same class. Value grade is for specific trim level evaluated, and may not reflect Consumer Guide's impressions of the entire model lineup.
Big & Tall Comfort
Big GuyB-
Tall GuyB-

Base price: $46,595 (not including $995 destination charge)

Options on test vehicle: Bullitt Electronics Package with blind-spot and cross-traffic alert ($2100),  MagnaRide damping system ($1695)

Price as tested: $51,385

 

Quick Hits

The great: Muscle-car power and attitude; great brakes and shifter, possible future collectible

The good: Decent ride, interior room, and trunk space for a performance-oriented sporty coupe

The not so good: Fuel economy, price premium for the “Bullitt” name

More Mustang price and availability information

 

Rick Cotta

It all depends on how you look at it.

Certainly the Bullitt is a desirable car, but … $10,000 worth of “desirable”? As we said ….

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

If the Dark Highland Green paint doesn’t spell it out for you (the car is also available in black), you’ll have to rely on the “Bullitt” badge on the trunklid along with what’s missing — including a rear spoiler and front grille “pony” badge — to identify this very special Mustang.

That’s roughly the base-price premium between the Bullitt and the already hyped-up 2018 Mustang GT with Performance Pack 2 we tested earlier this year, a similarly focused — and very impressive — performance machine. So why bite the Bullitt’s extra cost?

Car aficionados might question the price, but not the pedigree. Fashioned after the 1968 Mustang used in the namesake film starring Steve McQueen, the 2019 model is the third generation of the Bullitt (the others being offered for 2001 and 2008-2009), and happens to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the movie’s release.

Test Drive: 2015 Dodge Challenger R/T and SRT

In the 2019 iteration, the Bullitt comes very well equipped and with numerous notable mechanical bits, including a 480-horsepower 5.0-liter V8 (which offers 20 more horses than the engine in the tested GT with Performance Pack 2), a front strut-tower brace, a 6-speed manual transmission with short-throw shifter/”ball” shift knob/rev-matching on downshifts, electronic Line-Lock and Launch Control (for track use only), 3.73 Torsen limited-slip rear axle, huge Brembo brakes (more on these later), and wide tires (255/40-19 front, 275/40-19 rear). Bullitt-specific styling alterations delete the rear spoiler and the pony badge in the grille and add a special dash-panel number badge and monogrammed door-sill plates. Our tester also had optional MagnaRide suspension and blind-spot/rear-cross-traffic alert.

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

Although exterior badges are few, there are plenty of more subtle cues that remind buyers of what they have, including (left to right) monogrammed dashboard plaque, under-hood strut-tower brace, and door-sill plates.

In most regards, the Bullitt is similar to the GT Performance Package 2 version tested earlier, so see that review for more details. But a few things are worth mentioning separately.

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

The electronic instrument panel can be reconfigured for different layouts and also offers numerous lighting-color choices.

Included in the Bullitt (and available elsewhere) is a four-tone exhaust system that includes Quiet Start, Normal, Sport, and Track settings for increasing levels of volume. It sounded great. Also great was the clutch and shifter action, the latter thanks in part to a very short and precise throw, and we came to appreciate the rev-matching feature on downshifts. But really great were the brakes. We’ve driven other cars with Brembo calipers — sort of the benchmark for performance brakes — but these applied so quickly and strongly that they not only imparted great confidence and a “racy” feel, but their immediacy took some getting used to. (Kind of like in the “old days” when cars switched from manual brakes to the newfangled power brakes — not something younger drivers would have experienced.) Also notable is that while handling was expectedly excellent, the ride wasn’t correspondingly punishing — perhaps due in part to the optional MagnaRide suspension — and in fact was quite livable, even on our pockmarked Chicago streets.

Future Collectible: 2017-2018 Chevrolet Camaro ZL-1

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

Although considered a 4-passenger car, those in back have very limited head room. Trunk space isn’t bad, but the cargo area is very shallow. And while you can fold the rear seat backs to expand the space, the releases are located atop the seat back where they’re very awkward to reach, and the seat backs rest three inches above the level of the load floor, making it difficult to slide long items forward.

Other “collector-series” cars are on the market, but the Bullitt has the advantage of being loaded into the already-great Mustang case. And though it’s also offered in black, the unique Dark Highland Green paint — blended to match that of the 1968 Mustang McQueen drove in the film — is an instant heads-up to any car aficionado you’re likely to run across, as it stands out simply by virtue of its color. And there aren’t many collector cars that can be described the same way.

More Bullitt news and reviews

2019 Ford Mustang Bullitt

“We don’t need no stinkin’ badges” — at least not if the trademark Dark Highland Green paint is chosen. It essentially identifies the Bullitt all by itself. Furthermore, there’s so much that’s good about the Bullitt that you’re really making no sacrifice to drive what might well turn into a collectible … other than the $10,000 surcharge, that is.

Check out our Sporty/Performance Car Best Buys