You searched for: Thunderbird

Dec
31
1966 Ford Thunderbird

1966 Ford Thunderbird

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2005 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

In the decade or so since its 1955 introduction, the Ford Thunderbird came to attract a solid following from female motorists. Perhaps it’s no surprise, then, that the 1966 T-Bird convertible featured on these pages was intended to please a lady.

Sep
04
2002 Ford Thunderbird

2002 Ford Thunderbird

History has probably been unkind to the 11th-generation Ford Thunderbird. Ask your average enthusiast about the relative marketplace success of Ford’s retro-themed 2-seat convertible, and you’re likely to be told that the revived T-Bird was a flop.

Jun
08
1984 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe, 1984 Turbo Coupe

1984 Ford Thunderbird Turbo Coupe

Blame Audi, Saab, and Volvo if you like, but by the mid Eighties, turbocharging had a sophisticated European cachet to it, and a number of American carmakers were working to get in on the trend.

Sep
11
1962 Buick Riviera Designs

1963 Buick Riviera (L), and some of Collectible Automobile Publisher Frank Peiler’s “what-if” designs.

By Frank Peiler

Buick’s 1963 Riviera is widely considered to be one of the most beautiful cars ever produced by any auto manufacturer. This svelte personal-luxury hardtop coupe artfully blended American and British style, and it changed the Buick brand’s somewhat stodgy image almost overnight. General Motors styling chief William L. Mitchell freely admitted to borrowing some of the ’63 Riviera’s key design elements. Its razor-edge roof styling, for instance, was inspired by certain 1950s English custom bodywork.

Aug
27
Mercedes-Benz 300SL Designs, Mercedes-Benz 300SL Designs

1952 Mercedes-Benz W194 race car (L), and some of Collectible Automobile Publisher Frank Peiler’s “what-if” designs.

By Frank Peiler

It was early 1952 when Mercedes-Benz was in the midst of developing the 300SL sports car.  The skeletal frame, drivetrain and suspension were beautifully engineered masterpieces. However, the original form-follows-function body looked like a half-used bar of soap with a cap stuck on top. Let’s say that in this post-WWII era of rebuilding, there wasn’t much of a design department at Mercedes-Benz that the company could turn to.

Jun
26
1947 Chevrolet Fleetmaster Fleetline Aerosedan

1947 Chevrolet Fleetmaster Fleetline Aerosedan

Note: The following story was excerpted from the October 2006 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Let’s say you’re not convinced that appearance is an important factor—maybe the important factor—that drives car shoppers to choose one vehicle over another. Then consider the 1947 Chevrolet Fleetline Aerosedan. Despite being the most expensive two-door closed car in the Chevy lineup, it was still the most popular model of the best-selling brand in America in ’47.

May
21
1933 Hupmobile K-321 Convertible Coupe

1933 Hupmobile K-321 Convertible Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the April 2004 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

The automobile was meant to foster travel and, by golly, here’s one that has. The Hupmobile convertible coupe featured on these pages has been to Australia and back during its lifetime.

Jan
07
Plymouth XP-VIP Concept, Plymouth V.I.P., Plymouth VIP

Plymouth XP-VIP Concept

Forgotten Concepts This is an installment in a series of posts looking back on show cars that we feel deserved a little more attention than they got. If you have a suggestion for a Forgotten Concept topic, please shoot us a line or leave a comment below.

Sep
12
1988 Mercury Cougar, Mercury Cougar Ads

1988 Mercury Cougar

In the annals of automotive retailing, there are few–if any–model names that have been applied to more body types or market segments than Mercury’s Cougar badge. Over the moniker’s multi-decade run, it was used on coupes, sedans, station wagons, convertibles, pony cars, muscle cars, luxury cars, and, at the end of its run, a front-wheel-drive sporty hatchback.

Aug
16
1986 Merkur XR4Ti

1986 Merkur XR4Ti

Merkur, if you recall the brand, was in many ways a marketing complement to General Motors’s Geo experiment.