Posts from ‘Classic Car Ads’

Sep
13
1934 Tatra 77

1934 Tatra 77

It’s a shame that Tatra isn’t better known to American auto enthusiasts, because the Czechoslovakian automaker produced some of the most interesting cars and trucks of the industry’s first century.

Sep
05
1976 Ford Mustang II

1976 Ford Mustang II

I had this ad taped up in my high-school locker during my senior year. Not because I was a Mustang II fan—I was not—but because this ad so plainly laid bare how desperately Ford wanted their pony car to perceived as European and high tech, which it really wasn’t. (Note: I’m not quite that old. I graduated high school in 1983, and had found the Mustang ad in a back issue of Popular Science, I think.)

Aug
30

Hot Deal Madness

Fun fact: Most car dealers pay a small amount into a regional advertising fund for each vehicle they sell. That money is spent on ads and promotions tailored to reach would-be car shoppers in a given area. In many cases, manufacturers contribute additional cash to the fund. And, depending on the franchise, some of that money may be spent by the dealer on store-specific ads.

Aug
16

 

1971 Chrysler Imperial, Hidden Headlamps, Hidden Headlights

1971 Imperial LeBaron

If you trust Wikipedia, the Cord 810 was among the first automobiles to sport hidden headlamps. As far as design trends go, that’s a pretty auspicious starting point. For the purposes of this gallery, we are making a clear distinction between hidden headlamps—those found in or near a traditional grille–and pop-up headlamps along the lines of those found on the early-generation Mazda Miata or RX-7.

Jul
30

Favorite Car Ads: 1949 Ford

In high school, a buddy of mine and I often traded notes between classes. These notes consisted of little more than the random wit and doodles of two really bored teenagers, but they were often pretty funny. One practice we engaged in was creating ad copy for fake products. This copy was always rich with absurd branded slogans and liberal use of the ™ tag.

Jul
28

Motorola Car Radio

By Jim Flammang

Commercial radio stations were transmitting signals to the public in the early 1920s, amplified in 1924 by the broadcast of the final campaign speech by newly elected president Calvin Coolidge. Two years earlier, outgoing president Warren Harding had installed a radio in the White House.

Jul
19
Chevy Fuel Injection, Cars Ads Featuring Fuel Injection

1986 Chevrolet Pickup

By most accounts, the automotive period known as the Malaise Era lasted from 1973 until 1983. During that time, the performance of most new vehicles paled in comparison to the less-regulated cars of  just a few years earlier. Blame the government if you will, as low-lead gas, fuel-economy standards, and emissions regulations all took a serious toll on the horsepower output of most engines. I say most, because some cars suffered less than others. And there was one main reason for that relative immunity to the Malaise Era woes: fuel injection.

Jun
10
1959 Cadillac, Classic Cadillac Ads

1959 Cadillac

We apologize in advance. There’s a pretty good chance your favorite Cadillac isn’t included in the gallery below. As it turns out, though a luxury brand, General Motors’ luxury division has made available a surprising number of models and body styles over the years–more than we could cover in this gallery of vintage Cadillac ads.

Jun
02
1974 Renault Gordini, Obscure Car Ads

1974 Renault 17 Gordini

I’ll be frank: I collect car ads in different folders with the intention of finding a sufficient number of similar ads to create a blog-post gallery. The ads shared here? Well, I’m having the blog-post equivalent of a fire sale. I love these ads, but I can’t really see them becoming part of any article with anything like a coherent theme.

May
18
Eagle Premier ES, Eagle Ads

1989 Eagle Premier ES Limited

There were Eagle cars because the folks at Chrysler didn’t think the Jeep brand could stand on its own. Of course, this decision was made in the late Eighties. No one today would question Jeep’s viability as a stand-alone brand today.