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Jul
13
1934 Studebaker Commander Four-Door Sedan

1934 Studebaker Commander Four-Door Sedan

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2017 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

From the Speedway Comes Their Stamina, From the Skyway Comes Their Style” was the tagline for Studebaker advertising in 1934. The skyway reference was an attempt to tie Studebaker’s streamlined styling to aviation. The speedway reference was more grounded in fact.

Jul
05
1955 Willys Wagon

1955 Willys Utility Wagon

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2017 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

After building 362,841 four-wheel-drive 1⁄4-ton military scout cars—the legendary “jeep”—during World War II, Willys needed something to sell postwar. A civilian version of the Willys MB was introduced, but the company wanted something more mainstream.  

Jun
08
1941 Dodge WC-18 Ambulance

1941 Dodge WC-18 Ambulance

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2012 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Of the many things Chrysler Corporation manufactured for American and Allied military services during World War II, perhaps the ones most likely to be still seen today are four-wheel-drive trucks produced by Dodge. They were manufactured in an array of body types for myriad battlefield tasks, and military-vehicle collectors still covet and preserve examples that have survived the ravages of war and time. 

May
26
Duntov Mule

1955 Chevrolet Corvette “Duntov Mule”

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2012 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

As the Chevrolet Corvette’s 60th birthday approaches, it’s easy to forget the two-seater wasn’t a muscular, race-winning sports car from the start. Rushed into production with a “Blue-Flame” six and Chevy’s Powerglide automatic transmission, the car that wowwed Motorama crowds in New York in early ’53 was a tough sell little more than a year later. The addition of Chevy’s new V8 engine in 1955 really didn’t help Corvette sales.

May
11
1955 Studebaker E7

1955 Studebaker E7

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Studebaker got off to a good start in the postwar truck market with the 1949 R-series trucks that had fresh styling by Robert E. Bourke. While running boards were still prominently displayed on the competing new designs from the Big Three brands, Bourke’s truck cab looked more modern with the running  boards concealed under the doors. 

Apr
30
Dodge Dart GTS Convertible Coupe

Dodge Dart GTS Convertible Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the April 2011 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

During the Sixties, the automobile market fractured into several different segments within the overall market. To be successful, most marques could no longer rely on a single one-size-fits-all strategy.

Apr
21
1960 Edsel Ranger

1960 Edsel Ranger

by Don Sikora II

Note: The following story was excerpted from the April 2011 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Introduced by the Ford Motor Company in September 1957, Edsel was Ford’s attempt to capture a larger portion of the medium-price new-car market. But by the start of the 1960 model year, the brand was on very shaky ground.

Mar
10
1959 Buick LeSabre Convertible

1959 Buick LeSabre Convertible

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2015 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

The latest Buick commercials feature surprised individuals who exclaim “That’s not a Buick!” when confronted by one of the marque’s new vehicles, implying how much the brand has changed in recent years even if people’s perceptions of it haven’t yet. In 1959, Buick could have used the same tagline.

Feb
18
1971 Toyota Celica ST Hardtop Coupe

1971 Toyota Celica ST Hardtop Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2015 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

In 1971, Toyota introduced its Celica sport coupe, a car that many automotive magazines compared to the original Ford Mustang. By 1971, Mustang had grown eight inches longer and 600 pounds heavier than the ’65 original. (Ford President Lee Iacocca realized this was too big for a “ponycar” and had a much smaller Mustang in the pipeline.) Meanwhile, import coupes such as the Celica, Opel Manta, and Mercury Capri catered to those who wanted a sporty car that was smaller than the early Seventies ponycars. 

Dec
30
1961 Plymouth Belvedere Four-Door Sedan, Lexus Grille

1961 Plymouth Belvedere Four-Door Sedan

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2017 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Plymouth spent the early Sixties in crisis mode. Sales of the 1960 Plymouths had been disappointing. Although the 1961 car was a continuation of the 1960 body shell, it got a complete makeover. Only the roof and doors were carried over—all other sheetmetal was new.