You searched for: Packard

Oct
17
1999 Packard Twelve Concept

1999 Packard Twelve Concept

If you’re roughly my age—let’s say five decades into this whole life process—you’ve seen a fair number of automobile brands fade into the sunset.

I was probably most impacted by the demise of Pontiac, but I remember feeling a twinge of sadness at the deaths of AMC, Mercury, Oldsmobile, Plymouth, and—no kidding—Checker.

Jul
25
1941 Packard One Sixty Deluxe Convertible Coupe

1941 Packard One Sixty Deluxe Convertible Coupe

Note: The following story was excerpted from the June 2016 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine.

Packard’s policy of gradual styling changes helped it to maintain a gold standard of resale value and allowed owners to keep their cars longer without looking dated. This linear styling policy served Packard well until the Forties. By then, though, American car design was changing at an incredible rate. Packard’s unhurried design evolution couldn’t keep up with the pace, and by ’41, its cars looked old fashioned.

Jul
17
1953 Packard Clipper

1953 Packard Clipper

There’s no question that Packard is out of business, but there is some disagreement as to when the company really wrapped things up. Though the Packard brand officially died after 1958, some purists consider 1956 to be the marque’s final year, as that was the last time the automaker built its own cars based on its own designs and technology.

Apr
02

1952 Packard Pan American

Note: This article is reprinted from the February 2013 issue of Collectible Automobile.

Longtime Collectible Automobile readers may recall the 1952 Packard Pan American from an October 1986 story and from an October 1992 Personality Profile on its designer, Richard Arbib. So why this encore? Well, aside from the pleasure of seeing an old friend still hale and hearty, this Pan American is the first of only six built—and the only one built without its intended folding top.

Jan
12

1957 Packard Concept Car, 1957 Packard Prototype

The year 1956 marked the last hurrah for the “real” Packard. After that, Studebaker tried (somewhat successfully) to turn a Studebaker President into a Packard, but it was too little (literally!) too late.

Nov
02
Station Wagons That Never Were

What if America’s independent automakers would have offered true station wagons in the early 1950s?

By Frank Peiler

At the dawn of the 1950s, the American new-car market was running strong. The pent-up consumer demand caused by the World War II production hiatus had not yet been sated, and sales were booming for Detroit’s “Big Three” and numerous independent American automakers. And, as Americans moved to the suburbs in greater numbers, “family hauler” station wagons were becoming more popular at Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors. Ford was particularly successful—its expanded roster of all-new-for-1952 wagons would go on to be the number-one-selling wagon line for many years.

Oct
26
1957 Chevrolet

1957 Chevrolet

I was born a train guy. I became a car guy around the age of 10, but I never really stopped being a train guy. I don’t know anything about trains, but I love them, and I usually consider myself lucky when I am stopped at a railroad crossing within easy view of the passing rail cars.

Jul
13
1934 Studebaker Commander Four-Door Sedan

1934 Studebaker Commander Four-Door Sedan

Note: The following story was excerpted from the August 2017 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

From the Speedway Comes Their Stamina, From the Skyway Comes Their Style” was the tagline for Studebaker advertising in 1934. The skyway reference was an attempt to tie Studebaker’s streamlined styling to aviation. The speedway reference was more grounded in fact.

May
11
1955 Studebaker E7

1955 Studebaker E7

Note: The following story was excerpted from the December 2018 issue of Collectible Automobile magazine

Studebaker got off to a good start in the postwar truck market with the 1949 R-series trucks that had fresh styling by Robert E. Bourke. While running boards were still prominently displayed on the competing new designs from the Big Three brands, Bourke’s truck cab looked more modern with the running  boards concealed under the doors. 

Apr
12
1955 Packard Caribbean

1955 Packard Caribbean

What price luxury? If you were shopping for a new car in 1955, that number was approximately $3000. It was around that dollar amount that the vehicles we might now describe as premium starting kicking in.